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The Americans After Show recaps, reviews and discusses episodes of FX's The Americans. Show Summary: Philip and Elizabeth Jennings are two KGB spies in an arranged marriage who are posing as Americans in suburban Washington, D.C., shortly after Ronald Reagan is elected president. The couple have two children, Paige and Henry, who are unaware of their parents' true identities until they tell Paige after some time has passed. The complex marriage becomes more passionate and genuine each day bu ...
 
The Mash-Up Americans is your guide to the hyphen-America world we all live in. Amy S. Choi and Rebecca Lehrer talk culture, identity, race and what makes us who we are. Get to know yourself, America. This season we're talking about grief in a special series called Grief, Collected. At The Mash-Up Americans we are celebrating and challenging the raucous, colorful, complicated country we live in by asking all the important, awkward questions: What does it mean to be an immigrant in America? W ...
 
On January 20th, 2021, Joe Biden will deliver his inaugural address – the first speech he will give as president. The history of the address goes back to 1789, with George Washington's first. The inaugural address provides hope to a nation, letting them know that the best is yet to come, that days of glory and happiness are ahead. From November 18th until January 19th, I'll be publishing a new address everyday read by myself or someone else. Look out for the book, My Fellow Americans, on Jan ...
 
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The Semi-Americans Podcast

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The Semi-Americans Podcast

Eduardo R, Amanuel B & Daniel Y

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Three friends talk about their first-generation experiences in America while navigating through the ups and downs of life. Growing up with immigrant parents can be difficult to comprehend, you may know the feeling. Come enjoy our commentary on the intersectionality of nationality, culture, and family. Twitter: @semiamericans IG: @semiamericanspodcastTikTok: @semiamericanspodcastFacebook: @semiamericanspodcasthttps://linktr.ee/semiamericanspodcast
 
This series is dedicated to delving into the Patriots that never graced your textbooks, signed the Declaration of Independence, or had a movie made about them. This podcast is a deep look into some of the heroes of the Revolution who have long gone unsung; the African Americans who fought for the freedom of a new nation that wouldn't give them theirs for another century.
 
The church and religion has played and continues to play a big role in the African-American community. Yet, many of us who grew up in the traditional black church do not have an understanding of how our faith evolved under the duress of slavery and discrimination to be and to represent what it does today. The purpose of this broadcast is to provide that background knowledge while also pointing out the dividing line between what is just tradition and true faith in Jesus Christ.
 
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Welcome to the fourth meditation of our Grief, Collected series, which come out every Friday. Today is a literary meditation with the esteemed author Alexander Chee. Alexander is the bestselling author of Edinburgh and The Queen of the Night, and a beautiful essayist making meaning of the world around us and helping us imagine new ones. In today’s …
 
In this episode, we return to New Mexico and look at the ambitious mission-building program of the Franciscans in the Pueblos of New Mexico during the long seventy years between the founding of Santa Fe in 1610 and the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Among other moments, we recount the revolt at the Jemez Pueblo in 1623. The Franciscan project, in the end, …
 
Collective grief! What does it mean to grieve as a community? As a country? We’re thinking about what it means to face our losses and our grief head on — together — in order to repair our society. What does it mean to lose a future that we might have imagined? Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg joins us to talk about some of the roots of our grief culture here…
 
For today’s meditation: grab a pencil and paper! The bestselling illustrator and graphic journalist Wendy MacNaughton is the founder and host of Draw Together. She will lead us through a drawing exercise “Chill Out Drawing for Stressed Out Times.” Draw Together is a participatory drawing podcast and interactive art class focused on imagination and …
 
You know how when you are grieving you might feel clumsy? Or perhaps your heart literally hurts - not metaphorically? These are some of the many physical manifestations of grief that have been scientifically observed - and humanly felt. And not just humanly!!! Animals grieve! Wait until you learn about crow funerals! Today we’re talking to Dr. Doro…
 
In this episode we roll back the timeline a bit to 1602, and recount the exploration and mapping of the coast of California by Sabastian Vizcaino. He would name many of the famous places along that coast, and return a hero, only to be deprived of his just reward by perfidious Spanish politics. Had that not happened, American history in the west mig…
 
Welcome to the second meditation of our Grief, Collected series, which come out every Friday. Today is a breathing meditation with Linda Thai. Linda is a therapist and leads meditations as part of her somatic healing practice. She will take us on a 10 minute meditation to explore our relationship to our ancestors through release and healing. And fo…
 
America! The land of opportunity! And also, for so many Mash-Ups, the ambiguous loss of immigration and uprooting a life and a history comes with a complex web of emotions. Today we’re talking to the trauma therapist and educator Linda Thai about ancestral grief, and how unmetabolized grief, particularly in Mash-Up families, is passed down through …
 
This is an encore presentation of one of most popular episodes, “Notes on Thanksgiving,” which dropped on Thanksgiving Day, 2021. This is a great pre-listen for your Thanksgiving celebration, insofar as you will be able to roll out all sorts of impressive Thanksgiving history factoids and impress those all-important in-laws! The original show notes…
 
Welcome to the first meditation of our Grief Collected series, which come out every Friday. Today we have a series of 4 songs on grief from Daniela Gesundheit and Snowblink. A lot of Daniela’s music engages with grief, as she weaves together stories from her personal experience and her Jewish traditions. These meditative episodes are an invitation …
 
We’ve been looking around these past couple years, wondering what grief is in America. Today we start at the beginning and we have some BIG QUESTIONS. What is grief? What is the particularly American approach to grief and grieving — or not grieving as it were? Will we be okay?! We are joined by two of the world’s leading grief experts. George Bonan…
 
This Sidebar episode starts with my notes from my trip to Cuba “in support of the Cuban people,” one of the exceptions to the general ban on Americans traveling there. Those notes lead to a story from American – Cuban relations: Three “filibustering” invasions of Cuba launched from the United States in the 1840s, the strange American origin of the …
 
This episode is about a happy-go-lucky Englishman named Thomas Morton, whom William Bradford dubbed the “Lord of Misrule,” and who would be a thorn in the side of Puritans in New England for more than fifteen years. Here’s how Bradford described Thomas Morton in Of Plymouth Plantation: …Morton became Lord of Misrule, and maintained (as it were) a S…
 
We’re back!!! Welcome to a new series about grieving and life from The Mash-Up Americans. Grief, Collected is where we explore how grief moves through our bodies, our families, and our communities — and why we need to feel it all in order to transform our future. Launching November 15 — with new episodes every Tuesday and new meditations every Frid…
 
New Netherland gets off to a rocky start, with uncommonly poor leadership. Fortunately, a very capable leader, Peter Minuit, steps forward after a catastrophic attack on the Dutch at Fort Orange by the Mohawk. Minuit would consolidate most of the settlers at New Amsterdam, and buy Manhattan from the Leni Lenape Indians on the island. Notwithstandin…
 
This is the beginning of the story of New Netherland, the Dutch colonization of today’s New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and elsewhere in the mid-Atlantic. New Netherland was a long-ignored period in American history, but has come into its own in recent years. The Dutch and New Netherland are now seen to have had a significant impact on the early…
 
This is an encore presentation of our special Columbus Day episode, which originally dropped on October 12, 2021. It remains one of the most popular episodes of the History of the Americans. Last year I released it on the actual day, rather than on the Monday holiday, but this year I’ll go with the flow. One of the reasons is that all the popular a…
 
We are back in Virginia. Opechancanough’s attack of March 22, 1622, the day the sky fell, has knocked the English back on their heels, but not out of Virginia. In this episode, the English react, both with domestic controversy and military force. The Virginia Company invents corporate “damage control.” King James I gives the Company all the obsolet…
 
This episode snips off some loose ends. We examine Squanto’s ambiguous and controversial legacy, and look at a few interesting Pilgrim stories through the summer of 1623 that did not fit well into the timeline narrative of the last few episodes, including Indian gambling, a miracle of prayer during extreme weather, and the decision by the leaders o…
 
By fall 1622, the new settlers sent by Thomas Weston – except those who were sick and remained in the care of the Pilgrims -- left to settle in Wessagussett, twenty-two miles to the north of Plymouth at the site of today’s Weymouth. It was in fact a great location for a settlement with one important qualification: It was decidedly in the territory …
 
After some English killed one of Opechancanough's most celebrated warriors, Nemattanew, in the belief that he had killed an English trader, the great chief Opechancanough reassured Sir George Yeardley, the governor of the English in Virginia, that “the Sky should sooner fall than Peace be broken.” This was part of Opechancanough's extraordinarily d…
 
Opechancanough, successor to paramount chief Powhatan, deserves to be remembered as one of the great indigenous leaders in American history, on the same rank as Massasoit, King Philip, Pontiac, Logan the Orator, Joseph Brant, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and Geronimo. His biography, the important prerequisite to his war on the English in 1622, is not…
 
It is the fall of 1621. After the show of force at Nemasket, the cementing of relations with Massasoit, and the three day feast we now regard as "the first Thanksgiving," the Pilgrims confront enemies within. The Pilgrims did not yet know it, but for the next year and a half they would battle perfidy, betrayal, and enemies within who would threaten…
 
In the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims have met Samoset and Tisquantum, and were learning from Squanto to feed themselves. This they would be able to do within one growing season, something the settlers at Jamestown took many years to accomplish. They had also signed a peace treaty with the grand sachem of the Wampanoag, Massasoit.Now they are learnin…
 
"Welcome, Englishmen!" The Pilgrims had had been building houses and establishing defenses for Plymouth for three months before Samoset, an Abenaki sagamore representing the Wampanoag chief Massasoit, marched boldly into town. Until that moment, they had seen a few Indians watching them, but had made no contact. Now, Massasoit had to decide whether…
 
It is November 11, 1620. The Mayflower has anchored in the harbor at today's Provincetown, Massachusetts. The passengers and crew of the Mayflower had been stuffed into the small ship for at least ten weeks, and for those who didn't go ashore in England longer than that. They were eager to get off the ship, explore the region, and find a permanent …
 
Who were the Pilgrims, and how was it that they settled in the Netherlands, only to sail on the Mayflower for the lower Hudson River? And having done that, what was it like on board, and how was it they ended up in New England?All will be revealed, including the story of John Howland, who narrowly escaped death on the crossing and who is today ance…
 
We're baaccccckkkkk!!!! We have so much good stuff coming to you this year - about life and grief and joy. To start - The Mash-Up Americans has produced it's first fiction show Love & Noraebang! It's the most happy, joyful, fun Mash-Up love story starring Randall Park, Justin H. Min and Francia Raisa. Our tagline: The only thing better than karaoke…
 
This episode starts at the end of the story of the Pilgrims at Plymouth by looking at the famous "Mayflower Compact," and how Americans have spoken and written about it for more than 200 years. Was it a "document that ranks with the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution as a seminal American text," or merely an expediency f…
 
This year’s Independence Day "Sidebar" episode is about 18 year-old Daniel Webster’s first public speech, on the 4th of July, 1800, in front of an audience of good citizens in Hanover, New Hampshire. The speech is interesting for a number of reasons, including that it shows how early in our history the 4th of July became the national holiday for or…
 
The year 1619 is a famous one in the history of Virginia. There were two big moments -- the introduction of the "Great Charter," which brought representative government to the future United States for the first time, and the first importation of enslaved Africans in English North America. This episode, Part 1, looks at the innovation of the Great C…
 
This episode looks at the kidnapping of Squanto - Tisquantum - in 1614, along with 26 other Wampanoags, in the context of the extraordinarily robust trade between northern Europeans and the tribes along the northeastern Atlantic Coast of North America. Tisquantum would become one of the most important "cosmopolitan" Indians of the era, and in a hor…
 
It is 1614. John Smith of Jamestown fame is now looking for a new gig, and he sets his gimlet eye on the northeast coast of North America. He travels the coast in a small boat, and by 1616 has produced a tract called "A Description of New England" with an accompanying map. He gives New England its name, and makes the case for the English settlement…
 
On May 30, 1931, the Saturday after Memorial Day, the beleaguered President Herbert Hoover addressed a crowd of 20,000 people under sweltering heat at Valley Forge. This episode looks at that speech in the context of Hoover's life and times. Contemporary listeners will see much that is familiar in Hoover's speech -- politicians are in many ways sim…
 
We are on the road to Plymouth. There are several strands that weave together in 1620, when the Pilgrims on the Mayflower land at an abandoned Indian village known as Patuxet, at a site John Smith had named Plymouth. One of those strands is the rise of dissident Protestantism in England, and the idea that it might best be dealt with by transplantin…
 
Samuel de Champlain returns to New France in 1615, and leads an alliance of Huron and Algonquin tribes into western New York State to attack Onondaga, the heavily fortified heart of Iroquois territory on the site of today's Syracuse. Along the way Champlain goes fishing on Lake Huron and Lake Ontario, and we learn that he was not the first European…
 
We're back after our week off! In this episode we touch on our vacation driving the Natchez Trace, and then proceed briskly to the career of Samuel Argall - Pocahontas's kidnapper - in the service of the Virginia Company and himself. Most importantly, we look at the hilariously devious ruse that Argall deployed in 1613 to "displant" the French colo…
 
On the concluding episode of season 2, the cast reaches out to listeners to help them recap the journey so far. Listeners also share their thoughts on their favorite moments and what they hope to hear discussed in future episodes. Season 2 is a wrap. Check out all the content we've put out till now while we take this much needed break. Shout out to…
 
On this episode, the team starts by discussing their thoughts about weddings before moving on to the news of Elon Musk buying Twitter. What consequences can we expect on a platform with unmonitored free speech? How do we weigh free speech against purposeful misinformation? A complex matter. We then transition to this concept of “otherization.” Why …
 
This episode is a “Sidebar,” which is our term for an episode that is off the timeline of the History of the Americans. This episode centers on a concurring opinion delivered by Justice Neil Gorsuch in a case handed down by the United States Supreme Court only a few days ago, on April 21, 2022. The case, United States vs. Vaello Madero, addresses a…
 
It is late winter, 1616. When last we left our lovers, John and Rebecca Rolfe were in receipt of a request from the Virginia Company to come to London. They had a young son, Thomas, barely a year old, so this must not have been an easy decision to make.This episode is about that trip to London in 1616 and 1617. The young family sailed in April 1616…
 
This episode is about the kidnapping and ransom of Pocahontas in 1613, the romancing of her by John Rolfe, her conversion to Christianity, and their marriage in 1614, which settled the First Anglo-Powhatan War. We look at the two protagonists, their different personalities, their motives, and the extent of their emotional attachment. My primary sou…
 
What was supposed to be an in-depth discussion regarding legacy turns into the interrogation of "Manny Long Legs". Except this time, Amanuel has them a little shook when he starts firing back. While recording this episode, we didn't feel like we talked about much but on the playback we actually covered a lot of ground. Don't miss an episode that in…
 
This episode is a close look at the First Anglo-Powhatan War, which began shortly after John Smith left Jamestown forever in October 1609, and ended as a formal matter with the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe. The war was extremely bloody, if casualties are measured as a percentage of original population, and is noteworthy as the first true w…
 
In Season 2 Episode 13 the trio gets into a discussion about the etymology of names, first discussing the origin of "Korea" and then into the Korean naming convention and multiple tangents from there. Eddie talks about his family nickname and Manny earns a new one "Manny Long Legs". The guys then begin discussing dating taller women and that leads …
 
After the experience of 15 months, 66 substantive episodes, and more than 180,000 aggregate downloads/listens, I thought it would be useful to reintroduce the podcast. I labored over the original introduction and still stand by it, and yet it does not really reflect the tone of the podcast as it has turned out. This episode is therefore a new intro…
 
On part 2 of our episode with author/journalist/activist/insertothercooltitle Jeff Pearce, we discuss his upcoming book The Gifts of Africa releasing worldwide on April 15 (PREORDER tinyurl.com/393kxywx). He writes, “The West will begin to understand Africa when it realizes it’s not talking to a child—it’s talking to its mother.” Unfortunately, lit…
 
Again we digress into the question of privateering and letters of marque, and then take on the stories of the two "sons" whom Christopher Newport and the paramount chief Powhatan exchanged as hostages and emissaries in 1608, the English boy Thomas Savage and the young Powhatan man Namontack. Neither are as famous as Pocahontas or, for that matter, …
 
Another episode, another special guest graces us with their insight! Jeff Pearce (author, journalist, activist, ally for African progress) joins us to discuss his time in Ethiopia at the height of the war waged by the TPLF on Ethiopia (the war still continues...). Jeff was present on the ground in places such as Dessie, Lalibela, and Afar. He spent…
 
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