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The New Statesman Podcast

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The New Statesman Podcast

The New Statesman

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Twice a week the New Statesman politics team - Stephen Bush, Anoosh Chakelian and Ailbhe Rea - discuss the latest in UK politics. From Boris Johnson's latest battle with backbenchers to the machinery behind the Labour Party's opposition attack lines, this is the debrief you need to understand what's really happening in Westminster and beyond. New episodes Tuesday and Friday. Send your questions at youaskus.co.uk. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
The New Statesman is the UK's leading politics and culture magazine. Here you can listen to a selection of our very best reported features and essays read aloud. Get immersed in powerful storytelling and narrative journalism from some of the world's best writers. Have your mind opened by influential thinkers on the forces shaping our lives today. Ease into the weekend with new episodes published every Saturday morning. For more, visit www.newstatesman.com/podcasts/audio-long-reads See acast. ...
 
Welcome to Hidden Histories, hosted by Helen Lewis. In each series we explore a subject that the textbooks hid, held-back or hijacked, starting with “The Great Forgetting: women writers before Austen”. For more, head to newstatesman.com/podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
In this special New Statesman podcast series we expand on our New Times issue which identifies the political, economic and philosophical shifts shaping our society. The series will feature special guests and New Statesman's staff giving their view on what lies ahead for Labour and the left. Guests include Vince Cable, Phil Collins, Neal Lawson and Ros Wynne-Jones. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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In the wake of the pandemic, mental health referrals for adults and children have doubled. Has Covid sparked a parallel wave of mental illness? Or is grief and sadness a natural response to those months of isolation, uncertainty and daily death tolls? In this richly reported long read, New Statesman associate editor and feature writer Sophie McBain…
 
In a major blow to Boris Johnson, the Conservatives have lost the seats of Tiverton and Honiton and Wakefield to the Liberal Democrats and Labour respectively, by double-digit margins. In the wake of the results, Oliver Dowden, the co-chairman of the Conservative Party, became the first cabinet minister to resign (if implicitly) over the PMs leader…
 
In 1972 the Club of Rome published the Limits to Growth report: a pioneering document on the extent to which the Earth's natural resources can support rates of industrialisation and population growth. Now, 50 years on, we consider the impact of that report and what is happening to create a new social and economic paradigm that will help the global …
 
Strikes across Europe have thrown the continent into chaos just as summer travel takes off. Emily Tamkin, Alona Ferber and Alix Kroeger discuss what is driving workers across the public sector to take to the picket line, and they speculate where the “summer of discontent” is headed. In Israel, the coalition government has dissolved, prompting the f…
 
In the final episode of this series of France Elects Ido Vock, Europe correspondent, is joined by the New Statesman’s writer-at-large Jeremy Cliffe to digest France’s legislative election, at which Emmanuel Macron’s party failed to win a majority and Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Rally had its best ever result. Macron will now be the first pre…
 
With just a few days until the Tiverton and Honiton by-election on 23 June, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Statesman’s business editor and Devonian Will Dunn, who has returned from a reporting trip to the south-west constituency. They discuss how cost of living is the big issue on the doorstep, why the Lib Dems have a mountain to climb to wi…
 
With Russia’s invasion of Ukraine heading towards its fifth month, Europe correspondent Ido Vock speaks to the former Nato general secretary Anders Fogh Rasmussen. They discuss what else can be done to support Ukraine, what form security guarantees for a neutral Ukraine might look like, and why democracies need to stand up to autocrats. Further rea…
 
Music writer Pete Paphides has turned to songwriters and musicians, from Abba to the Undertones, to make sense of all the big moments in his life. So when he got the call he was dreading, to say that his father was dying, it was music that saw him through shock, denial and loss. In this moving audio essay, read by the author, Paphides explores both…
 
The by-election in Wakefield on June 23 will be a crucial test of whether Labour can win the Red Wall back from the Conservatives. The election was triggered by the resignation of the Conservative MP Imran Ahmad Khan after he was found guilty in April of sexually assaulting a teenaged boy. Khan was elected in the 2019 general election as the first …
 
On 7 June, the former German chancellor Angela Merkel appeared at a speaking event at a Berlin theatre, to discuss how she has spent the past six months since leaving office and reflect on present politics. Jeremy Cliffe in Berlin joins Emily Tamkin and Katie Stallard in Washington DC to assess Merkel’s defiant stance on her policies towards Moscow…
 
In the first of a two-part special of France Elects, as the united left comes ahead of Emmanuel Macron’s party in the first round of the French legislative elections, we look at what this might mean for the French president and what’s to play for in Sunday’s second round. Europe Correspondent Ido Vock discusses the result with Alix Kroeger. They ta…
 
Fresh from his reporting trip to Kharkiv in Ukraine, Bruno Maçães talks to Katie Stallard about the mood in Ukraine. They discuss how Kharkiv is at the heart of a new national movement, why Ukraine needs long-range artillery capabilities and how Macron’s “off-ramp” offer to Putin will not help end the war. Further reading: Bruno Maçães’s Diary: Kha…
 
The New Statesman podcast takes a special look at the Green Party, following their success in the local elections. Why did they do so well in May? And how can they build on this to become a major player in UK politics? Anoosh Chakelian is joined by our polling expert, Ben Walker, and environment correspondent India Bourke. If you have a question fo…
 
On June 21 2022, Prince William will turn 40. What kind of king will the second-in-line be: the moderniser who posed for the cover of Attitude magazine, or the relic behind a disastrous recent tour of the Caribbean? Freelance writer Tanya Gold sets out in search of the ‘real’ William, talking to former colleagues and collaborators, joining a royal …
 
Prime Minister Boris Johnson is attempting yet another relaunch of his government just days after 148 MPs told him they don’t have confidence in his leadership. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Harry Lambert discuss the rebels' next move, what this means for the government, and whether Keir Starmer should have been more aggressive at PMQs. The…
 
After narrowly missing out on making the second round of the presidential election, the leader of the left in France, Jean-Luc Mélenchon, is battling Emmanuel Macron’s renamed Renaissance party to win this weekend’s legislative elections. Could he give the president a tough five years? The New Statesman's Europe correspondent, Ido Vock, joins Emily…
 
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has won a vote of confidence from Conservative MPs. But 148 members voted against him, leaving a split party. In this special episode of the New Statesman Podcast, recorded at the Tate Britain just down the road from the Palace of Westminster, Rachel Cunliffe interviews the political editor Andrew Marr on where this dev…
 
On the day that Boris Johnson faces a vote of no confidence in his leadership, Rachel Cunliffe speaks to Harry Lambert, senior political correspondent, and Ben Walker, the New Statesman’s polling expert, about how we got here. They talk about the Prime Minister’s chances of survival, the damage done to him already and what to expect from by-electio…
 
Bessborough House, a grand mansion on the outskirts of the city of Cork, was one of Ireland’s largest mother and baby institutions, open from 1922 to 1998. Thousands of women and girls confined there had their babies taken from them and placed for adoption, often without maternal consent. In her new bestselling book, Bessborough: Three Women, Three…
 
Since Alexander Lukashenko, the president of Belarus, stole an election two years ago his regime, already one of the most repressive in Europe, has been cracking down on opponents real and imagined. These include the fanatical supporters – “ultras” – of Belarusian football clubs, inspired by tales of Ukrainian football hooligans joining protests in…
 
As the EU claims victory with a partial oil embargo on Russia, Ido Vock, Emily Tamkin and Katie Stallard discuss whether Hungary’s right-wing populist prime minister, Viktor Orbán, is weakening the West's response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. They also look at the significance of Russia’s latest advances in the east of Ukraine. Then, in You …
 
The campaign to remove Boris Johnson as Prime Minister is building. The steady trickle of letters from Conservative MPs declaring they have no confidence in him and criticism from high-profile dissenters has sparked speculation that there could be a vote as early as next week. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe and Freddie Hayward discuss what’s cau…
 
Fresh from Sydney, Professor Marc Stears, a former Labour speechwriter and author of its 2015 manifesto, tells Anoosh Chakelian what Labour can learn, and where Keir Starmer is going wrong. Stears reflects on how Anthony Albanese, the new Labor prime minister of Australia, avoided culture warring with Scott Morrison, his predecessor, what Keir Star…
 
When the site of the Chernobyl disaster was occupied by Russian troops during their invasion of Ukraine, fears of further contamination put the safety of nuclear power in the spotlight once again. In his latest book, Atoms and Ashes: From Bikini Atoll to Fukushima, the Ukrainian historian Serhii Plokhy looks at the history of nuclear disasters and …
 
On 17 June 1972, a nightwatchman stumbled across a burglary at the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington DC – triggering what became known as Watergate, the investigation that ultimately led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation. Fifty years on, the historian Colin Kidd reflects on Watergate’s renewed relevance in a populist, …
 
Sue Gray’s long-awaited report has been published at last. It contains lurid details of excessive drinking and partying at Downing Street during lockdown, as well as a “lack of respect and poor treatment” towards cleaners and security guards. But what does it mean for Boris Johnson? Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Cunliffe, Freddie Hayward and Harry Lambe…
 
Australia has a new prime minister, but how much of an impact did climate change have on the defeat of Scott Morrison? Environment and sustainability editor Philippa Nuttall joins Emily Tamkin and Katie Stallard to discuss Labor’s election win. Plus, with Covid spreading rapidly in North Korea, is there any sign the regime will accept international…
 
Jeremy Hunt tells Anoosh Chakelian how he regrets the "silent killer" of social-care cuts made when he was in the cabinet, calls for the "penny to drop" for the current health secretary Sajid Javid on properly funding social care, and warns of electoral woes for the Tories in their southern English "heartlands". He also admits he wouldn't rule out …
 
As millions of Ukrainians flee from the Russian invasion of their country, could those seeking refuge be vulnerable to exploitation? Alix Kroeger speaks to Suzanne Hoff, international coordinator at La Strada International, a European NGO that campaigns against human trafficking, about the organisation's new report on the dangers facing Ukrainian r…
 
When George Orwell travelled to Spain in the winter of 1936 to fight General Franco and the fascists, he stopped en route in Paris, where Henry Miller gave him his coat. The two men could not have been more different: the passionately political Englishman, and the American who disdained of all forms of activism. As Ian McEwan writes: “In a letter t…
 
UK inflation has reached its highest rate in 40 years, jumping from 7 per cent in March to 9 per cent in the year to April. With inflation hitting the poorest hardest, pressure is growing on the government to reverse its opposition to a windfall tax on energy profits. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the New Statesman's associate business editor Emma …
 
The mass shooting in Buffalo, New York, on Saturday (14 May) by a white nationalist appears to have shown the real consequences of the racist “great replacement theory”. Emily Tamkin in Washington, DC, Megan Gibson in London and Ido Vock in Berlin discuss how this far-right conspiracy theory evolved from being a fringe notion in France to entering …
 
While polling revealed exclusively by the New Statesman suggests that voters aren’t divided on so-called culture war issues, the Johnson administration is putting them at the centre of its political project. To understand why the Prime Minister seems intent on winning a war that doesn’t exist, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Kim Leadbeater, Labour MP…
 
Thus far, international concern for the Chinese Uyghur ethnic minority has been focused on their persecution within China itself. But the reach of the Chinese government's campaign against them extends to countries around the world. Katie Stallard is joined by Bradley Jardine, a research director at the Oxus Society for Central Asian Affairs and a …
 
It started with an innocent question posted on Yahoo! Answers in 2009, and snowballed into a thriving subreddit community: did anyone remember an American movie from the early Nineties called Shazaam, starring the comedian Sinbad as an incompetent genie who grants wishes to two children? Thousands of people did, vividly – and yet there was no trace…
 
Having cast himself as “Mr Rules” in opposition to Boris Johnson, Keir Starmer's reputation hangs in the balance amid allegations of breaking Covid restrictions. Anoosh Chakelian is joined by the NS's political editor, Andrew Marr, to discuss Starmer’s future, the mutinous atmosphere in the Labour machine and rumours of runners and riders who could…
 
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