Discovering Jazz सार्वजनिक
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Bebop was the ‘modern jazz’ of the early to mid 1940’s. And it’s still considered ‘modern jazz’. It is a genre that has lasted! And developed….with most new recordings being described as ‘post bop’ or ‘hard bop’. When many people claim to dislike jazz, they are often referring to the complex harmonies and rhythms of bebop. But listening to this epi…
 
I’ve discovered a lot of great music over the past two months—thanks to those top 10 lists compiled by 97 reviewers and critics. A handful of those albums would probably go on my own Top 10 list, were I to make one. In this episode I play tracks from 9 great albums from the past year. Some are pretty obscure, and some aren’t. This is the last episo…
 
I’ve tabulated the results of 97 reviewers and their top 10 albums lists for 2022. Here are the albums followed by the number of votes each one received. Mary Halvorson: Amaryllis (also Belladonna…not quite so often) 31 Cecille McLorin Salvant: Ghost Songs 28 Immanuel Wilkins: Seventh Hand 26 Makaya McCraven: In these Times 23 Tyshawn Sorey Trio: M…
 
There have been a total of 480 albums that 97 reviewers placed on their top 10 lists. That’s a lot! Wish I could listen to them all. But here’s a few I did listen to—at least in part—and want to play for you. This way you and I are making these ‘discoveries’ together. Although I suspect some of you are more familiar with many of them than I am. Nea…
 
Part two of a five part series focusing on albums from 2022 that jazz reviewers and critics have put on their ‘top 10’ lists. This week you’ll hear two Canadian ensembles–one from Vancouver called the Cookers Quintet led by Bernie Senensky, and another led by Calgary trombonist Carsten Rubeling. I also play two different artists who put out albums …
 
Beginning a five part series talking about and playing some of last year’s recordings about which jazz aficionados are *raving*. I’m jotting down every record placed in any of the ‘top 10’ (or so) jazz albums of 2022 lists. Then putting a check mark everytime somebody chooses it. Mary Halvorson’s Amaryllis albums seems to be everybody’s favourite,,…
 
No particular theme for this last podcast of 2022. But here are a few new and a couple older recordings that I’ve discovered recently—and am enjoying. In terms of newer recordings, You’ll hear Emmet Cohen, Billy Drummond and Freedom of Ideas, JD Allen, The Comet is Coming, Samara Joy w Pasquale Grosso, and the Alvin Queen Trio. From my new home of …
 
A lot of focus on how *playing* jazz (as well as listening to it) helps us. It starts with a short clip from Victoria musician Brian Tate about improvising as ‘saying yes’….sort of like a going with the flow. Lots of ‘flow’ in this episode. You’ll hear Wayne Shorter with some of the other greatest jazz musicians of all time. Then there’s Sonny Roll…
 
The therapy might be in the lyrics, the music, or the inspiration from the player’s journey. I play recordings by Ben Webster, Nina Simone, Tony Kofi, Ruth Brown, Duke Ellington, and Charlie Parker. From France, you’ll hear trumpeter and singer Jerome Etcheberry and his delightful rendition of Sometimes I’m Happy (Sometimes I’m Blue). And from Engl…
 
Here I play recordings I like that have been made very recently Lots of great Christmas and Winter tunes (both known and unknown). Played and sung by some of the best modern recording artists. My favourite? Ever hear Julie Christie’s “Hang Them On The Tree”. It’s something you can do with all the negativity and overwhelm in your life….to turn it in…
 
This episode features jazz tunes where there is some contention about who actually wrote it. For example, I put the writer of Nature Boy, Eden Ahbez on trial. Did he plagiarize the melody of Nature Boy from Herman Yablonskoff? He did end up paying Yablonskoff 25,000 dollars. Did he have to? Or did he just do it because he wasn’t in the mood for a l…
 
Since I just moved from Victoria B.C. to Edmonton Alberta—-in the midst of the wind and snow—I thought it would be a good idea to explore the Alberta jazz scene. I guarantee you’ll hear some great music in this episode! Some of them are jazz legends who came from Alberta, and others are local heroes. Some are up and coming. Some famous jazz artists…
 
My own jazz roots are very different from that of most jazz fans. I explored them in Episode 100, This episode is a further exploration. Warning! The music isn’t all jazz. But they all have some connection with jazz…at least for me. Many of these recordings and artists came to my attention thanks to two Edmonton, Alberta radio stations—CJCA (Top 93…
 
Still in the midst of moving to Edmonton—one or two more ‘archives’, then some more new episodes. But the good news is that the archived programs I’m posting are really good! This one includes six jazz tunes—or tunes often played by jazz artists. They are: -East of the Sun (West of the Moon) -Desifinado -Airegin -Spring Can Really Hang You Up the M…
 
Birds and bird calls have been quite the inspiration for a lot of jazz as well as classical compositions. You’ll hear a few of those inspired recordings plus the calls of some of the birds who inspired them. Also a bit of Bird—the nickname for Charlie Parker, who also wrote a lot of tunes inspired by birds.…
 
As I relocate my residence from Victoria to Edmonton, I need to take a few weeks off. So I have a few more episodes from the ‘archives’ before I start with some very interesting and entertaining new episodes. This is Part 2 of Jazz Drumming, with Victoria drummer, composer, and educator Kelby McNayr. You’ll hear some of the ‘roots’ of today’s drumm…
 
I’ve lived many places, but never came across a city with as many amazing musicians–especially jazz musicians—as I have here in Victoria, B.C. Much of it is thanks to Hermann’s Jazz Club, which began 40 years ago. It started because Hermann Nieweler was convinced to book a jazz trio led by clarinetist/saxophonist Al Pease at his Inn. The purpose? T…
 
Hello! In this episode I’m playing a few favourite recordings—lp’s and cd’s mostly. They are mostly ones I purchased at used record stores and thrift stores, as well as online, this past summer. Here’s the ‘lineup’. P.J. Perry Quintet with Bob Tildsley. They Kept Bach’s Head Alive. A really fascinating way to start the podcast. Andre Previn, who ma…
 
Playing a few selected recordings of artists who were highly rated on the latest Downbeat Critics poll. It starts with three tracks from the latest entry into the Jazz Hall of Fame. It finishes with the ‘best historical album’. Between you’ll hear someone who is both #1 jazz and #1 non-jazz artist (Quantum physics or a parallel universe maybe?). Th…
 
More music from jazz musicians who I enoyed seeing and hearing live this past summer. I play four selections where pianist Sullivan Fortner is featured. The first one’s by Cecile McLorin-Salvant, the second from trumpeter Giveton Gelin, and the third is from an album under his own name. The fourth is a surprise—not an artist that you would normally…
 
I’ve had a great summer for music, mostly thanks to the Victoria Jazz Festival. For this first episode of the new season, I’m playing recordings by some of those artists I had the pleasure of seeing and hearing and who most inspired me. Eight great selections are featured this week.द्वारा larrytheradioguy
 
In this episode, Victoria B.C. jazz drummer, composer, and educator, Kelby McNayr talks about the role of percussion in jazz. His thesis that while drumming has changed, it hasn’t necessarily ‘evolved’ is an interesting one. He demonstrates it through recordings over many eras of jazz. We talk about Baby Dodds, Zutty Singleton, Art Blakey, Philly J…
 
I love hearing interesting stories about the history of certain songs, including how they became popular. In this episode I explore five different songs that have been performed frequently by jazz artists. The first one, Scotch and Soda, nobody knows who really wrote it. The last one, Goodbye Pork Pie Hat came from an improvisation sparked by grief…
 
For this episode one of the highlights is a John Coltrane tune that has been described as a sort of ‘training wheels’ for Giant Steps. I also play recordings by Freddie Hubbard, Ornette Coleman, a Wes Montgomery tune by Christian McBride’s Big Band, and a J.J. Johnson tune recorded by Miles Davis. I play two Canadian tracks: a version of Chick Core…
 
This is part 3 of a 4 part series on some lesser played or heard tunes from the Real Book 6th Edition—a ‘bible’ for jazz students. This episode includes some obscure and some maybe not-so-obscure tunes from the point of view of the jazz player. You’ll hear some of the greatest jazz players and singers performing standards such as All of You, If You…
 
I had subscribed, from 1978 to 1983 to a series of 3-disk albums by Time Life Records called The Giants of Jazz”. A new one would be delivered to my door every month. They each contained a very detailed booklet including descriptions each recording on the six sides. I featured these albums on a series of 5 podcasts late in 2019. For this year’s sum…
 
A jazz bassist from Peterborough, Ontario, Craig Paterson talks about the music that ‘formed’ him, turning him into a jazz fan. He selected 10 albums, and in this episode he talks about five of them. And we play parts of them for you. At the same time Craig does a great job dissecting what it is about those recordings that made them so interesting …
 
From the Archives, some 78rpm records from my collection. 78’s were popular from the turn of the century up into the late 1950’s. One unique thing about 78’s is that you could eat them. Technically at least! As well as some great music, you’ll hear Alex Campagnolo, a researcher in Sustainability Studies–a man who focuses on the sustainability of re…
 
Continuing with my summer re-runs of some of the best from past podcasts. Today, Part 4 of a series on Jazz and Politics. It’s mostly music—featuring a few long tracks, such as the whole Freedom Suite by Sonny Rollins. A lot of this music is about freedom and the struggle for equality: for blacks and also for female artists. There is also a selecti…
 
A few years ago I put together a series of four Discovering Jazz Podcasts on jazz musicians who played on pop recordings. For these archives, I’m posting Part 3, Episode 26. (You may want to also listen to Episodes 24, 25 and 27 if you like this one). You’ll hear guitarist Louis Shelton and his connection with The Monkees. Then Wayne Shorter and St…
 
This week, as part of my ‘summer re-runs’, I feature Beatles tunes that have been adapted to jazz. Most are exquisitely done; some maybe not so much. And not only that I interview John Lennon. Okay—not really! What it is is interesting clips from an interview I did with Michael Gagliano, who starred as John Lennon in a London, England tribute show …
 
A program from January of 2018. A lot of real jazz lovers express a rather loud indifference—bordering on contempt—for the role of ‘vocals’ in jazz. Comments like ‘cheesy lounge singers’, ‘they keep the instrumental soloists from truly stretching out’, they make jazz musicians into accompanists, etc. come up. Yet for many of us—-myself included—the…
 
For my final podcast of the season (but don’t worry—I’ll be posting ones from the archives weekly), I play more artists performing at this year’s Victoria Jazz Fest, 2022. Lots of music this episode, and not much talk. You’ll hear (in order): Ghost Song–Cecile McLorin Salvant The Preacher–Taurey Butler Ranky Tanky–Ranky Tanky Chrome Beauty–Joy Lapp…
 
Putting together these three episodes allows me to find the time to listen to a bit of every performer coming to the upcoming Victoria Jazz Fest, Jun 24th to July 3rd (2022). And what a stellar line-up! In terms of straight jazz—this episode includes The Brubeck Brothers (two of Dave Brubeck’s sons), Ashley Wey from Victoria, trumpeter Giveton Geli…
 
Jazz is best enjoyed live! Watching musicians interacting with each other on stage, as well as with their instrument can be quite exciting. Coming up is The Victoria Jazz Festival June 24th to July 3rd. My plan is to listen to recordings of all the performers….so I can decide which concerts to see (and hear). And I’ll share what I ‘discover’ as I l…
 
Jazz has continuously evolved as a result of freeing itself from constraints. According to Steve Haines, jazz bassist and director of the Miles Davis Jazz studies program at the university of North Carolina, jazz as taught in music institutions today is being ‘whitewashed and creativity is being strangled. He says “we need to be singing what’s insi…
 
Steve Haines, professor and interim director of the Miles Davis Jazz Studies program at University of North Carolina talks about what he sees as the most essential elements of jazz. And we play music to illustrate some of those elements. What are the essential elements? They include the expected ones—blues and swing. But just as important are gospe…
 
If somebody asks you if you like jazz, how can you answer? There are so many sub-genres of jazz around today: hard-bop, be-bop, swing, fusion, Bossa Nova or Latin, funk, free jazz, Cool jazz, Afro-Cuban, world jazz, smooth jazz, astral jazz, etc. etc. etc. Today’s episode explores a few of those. You’ll even hear a bit of one very familiar melody p…
 
Some of the music in this week’s episode is new, a lot of it’s old; they are from lp records, cd’s, and downloads that I’ve recently acquired. Or, in some cases, about to acquire. The lp tracks are by Marian McPartland, H.B. Barnum, and Woody Hermann & Four Others. The cd’s include Angela Verbrurgge, Joey De Francesco, Wayne Shorter, and Jens Thoma…
 
I’m always on the look out for music that inspires me. I may find it through going into thrift stores, perusing emails and facebook mesages from friends and Discovering Jazz listeners, and even by looking at current jazz releases. It might be vinyl record, a cd, a youtube video, or whatever. For this episode and next weeks’ I play a few selections …
 
Oscar Peterson is described by one of his former students, Victoria’s Louise Rose, as being “driven”…yet still “without ego”. And in the 1972 documentary about him called In the Key Of Oscar, he expressed mixed feelings about the driven-ness, some of which was influenced by a desire to meet his father’s high expectations. There is also the theme of…
 
Here in Victoria we are blessed with having a marvellous pianist, singer, and arranger teaching and giving delightful concerts. Her name is Louise Rose, and she studied composition and arranging with the great Duke Ellington. This week’s I present part of an interview with Louise about her experience with Duke, and what she learned from him. It inc…
 
Part 1 was about its invention and the 9 different types of saxophones. Part 2 was it’s evolution in jazz as well as its use in classical, r’n’b, and rock ‘n roll. This episodes features more great jazz saxophonists, plus the instrument in modern classical and ‘art’ music. You’ll first hear how a tenor sax can sound so different–depending on whethe…
 
This is Part 2 of my three part series on the saxophone. I take you through the early days of jazz, then talk about how Coleman Hawkins transformed the tenor sax from “mooing and rubbery belches” into a purveyor of musical art. I also touch on the use of the saxophone in classical music, and raconteur and music historian, Al Baggs, from Peterboroug…
 
Beginning a 3 part series on the saxophone…it’s development and use in jazz and other forms of music. In this first episode I play recordings featuring each of the 9 saxophones–from the highest pitched sopranino to the lowest pitched sub contrabass. In-between you’ll hear lots of tenor, alto, baritone, and soprano sax played by the masters. You’ll …
 
It’s mostly from my jazz section…but not all. Some you might call ‘world music’, some ‘gospel’, a bit of funk, and one ‘pop; vocalist. But it’s all pretty good, I think (except for maybe the last one). And lots of real jazz!द्वारा larrytheradioguy
 
As I say in my introduction to the podcast, I do play lots of ‘jazz’ that is on the fringes of the genre. A lot of those can be found in my record collection. This week and next I’ve dipped into that collection and I’m spinning a few tunes. You’ll hear -DAWG music (some call it’ progressive bluegrass), j -jazz oriented world music, -a swinging vers…
 
I played some records by some great female instrumental jazz artists last week….and this week I have some more (plus a vocalist or two). I remember only a few years ago when people so often spoke about the dearth of women in the jazz world. And just within five years there numbers have blossomed. Just look at the critics and jazz fans polls in the …
 
March 8 is International Women’s Day. It falls on a Tuesday–the same day I upload these podcasts. It turned out to be so easy to find great female jazz instrumentalists; much easier than when I did a similar podcast four years ago. And the instruments? There’s piano, guitar, Pedal Harp, Trumpet, clarinet, tenor sax, bass, drums, orchestra arranger,…
 
From solo bass to bass in a big band. From free jazz to Gypsy Jazz. And lots more. You’ll hear more bassists in this episode. They include Christian McBride, Victoria’s Joey Smith, Eberhard Weber, Stanley Clarke, Charlie Haden, Ron Carter, Brandi Disterheft, Dave Holland, Tiny Grimes, and two by George Duvivier.…
 
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